Fairy Poems

So many enchanted places we’re whisked away to by the vivid words of poetry. This page is dedicated to fairies but you may come across other enchanted creatures of that charming realm of imagination. Like every other page on this site, we will be constantly adding new poems and stories. If you have any you’d like to see added, please let us know.

Wilford and Blue Halloween Hysteria

A Funny Halloween Book for Children

Fairy Town by Carolyn Wells
A Serious Question by Carolyn Wells
The Fairies by William Allingham
Fairy King by William Allingham
The Elf Singing by William Allingham
Chorus of the Fairies by William Allingham
Spring Time by Dolly Radford
Sea Fairies by Eileen Mathias
Little Men by Flora Fearne
What Bertie Saw in the Flowers by L.G.R.
Fairyland Secret Service by Carolyn Wells
Fairy Days by William Makepeace Thackeray
The Elf and the Dormouse by Oliver Herford
Fairy Song by Thomas Randolph
The Fairy Thrall by Mary C. G. Byron
Of Certain Irish Fairies by Arthur Guiterman
The Fairy Book by Abbie Farwell Brown
If I Were a Fairy by Charles Buxton Going
Fairy Songs by William Shakespeare
The Fairy Book by Norman Gale
The Satyrs and the Moon by Herbert S. Gorman
The Fairies of the Caldon Low by Mary Howitt
Queen Mab by Thomas Hood
Dream Song by Richard Middleton
The Little Elf by John Kendrick Bangs
The Fairy Folk by Robert Bird
Fairy Song by John Keats
Oh! Where Do Fairies Hide Their Heads by Thomas Haynes Bayly
In Fairyland by Joyce Kilmer
Catching Fairies by William Cory
I’d Love to be a Fairy’s Child by Robert Graves
The Lonesomest Fairy by Mary Carolyn Davies
Dryad by Mary Carolyn Davies
As You Would Be Done by Mary Carolyn Davies
The Fairies Dancing by Walter de la Mare
Dream Song by Walter de la Mare
The Horn by Walter de la Mare
Sleepyhead by Walter de la Mare
Happy, Happy It Is To Be by Walter de la Mare
The Dwarf by Walter de la Mare
The Truants by Walter de la Mare
Ballad of the Fairy Spoon by Laura E. Richards
Fairies by Laura E. Richards
Cobwebs by Amos R. Wells
Plumpuppets by Christopher Morley
A Fairy In Armor Joseph Rodman Drake
The Fairies’ Shopping by Margaret Deland
The Child and the Fairies by Unknown Author
The Last Voyage of the Fairies by W.H. Davenport
The Fairy Goldsmith by Elinor Wylie
Ghost Fairies by Frank Dempster Sherman
The Waterfall by Frank Dempster Sherman
Fairies by Evelyn Stein
Fairy Ring by Evelyn Stein
Good-Humor by Unknown Author
Lurlaline by Unknown Author
Dragon of the Black Pool a Chinese Poem
Ring-A-Ring O’ Fairies by Mary Nightingale
The Mermaid by Alfred Lord Tennyson
The Merman by Alfred Lord Tennyson
Found In The Woods by Irene F. Pawsey
Surf Sprite by Samuel Goodrich
Did You Ever See? by Evaleen Stein
The Picture-Book Giant by Evaleen Stein
What If by Evaleen Stein
Fairies by Eleanor Farjeon
An Explanation of the Grasshopper by Vachel Lindsay
Lullaby by J.W. Foley
The Snail and the Mouse by Laura E. Richards

Spring Book for Kids

For some kids (and adults) imagining an enchanted forest filled with unusual creatures opens up a new world of adventure. The possibilities are endless and to be able to leave the ordinary world behind and venture into a magical unknown alleviates the stresses of the real world. And through the ages poets have imagined enchanted realms in their poetry, telling stories and envisioning wild landscapes peppered with fairies, trolls, and brownies.

In our Fairy Poems for kids section on Rainy Day Poems we’re collecting an array of poetry that encompasses the imaginative enchantment that fairies bring along with all of the other creatures that inhabit this fantasy world.

You’ll find poems about every kind of fairy, from happy to sad, mischievous to helpful and silent to singing. There are giants, dwarves, ogres, dragons and many more mystical creatures to be found in poetry. All ages of kids can find poems that they’ll love from short to long and complicated to simple.

In the short poem The Lonesomest Fairy, a sad little sprite sits down and cries for lonesomeness. You can go ‘up the airy mountain and down the rushy glen’ in search of ‘little men’ and find an entire enchanted longer poem in the classic The Fairies. There are poems of Catching Fairies hidden underneath the soft flower petal or in the garden and even fairy lullabies to read before bed. Children who love fairies will find all kinds of imaginative possibilities in the Fairy Poems section.

For kids and parents who like elves, dwarves, giants or even mermaids and mermen, there are many other enchanted creatures represented in imaginative detail in the Fairy Poems section. A giant jumps right off the page in The Picture-Book Giant, or imagine a satyr child getting upset because they can’t have the moon as a toy in the Satyrs and the Moon. The possibilities are endless in the world of fantasy and poets bring that world to life in their poems. Make a habit of reading a poem to a child and open the doors to a world of enchantment.